All posts by johnd

Bush Medicine Leaves: An Aboriginal Art Dreaming

One of the most immensely popular and fascinating Aboriginal Dreaming stories is that of the Bush Medicine Leaves.Utopian women from Central Australia have long painted this ascetically pleasing and methodically executed story since the introduction of acrylic paint into their community.

The Utopian Women paint this dreaming as it pays homage to the natural shrub remedy which comes from the land and is used to treat small aliments, wounds, coughs and even be used as insect repellent. Commonly, leaves are boiled to extract the resin, which is then combined with Kangaroo or Emu fat.

A number of very talented and well recognised female Indigenous artists from Utopia paint the Bush Medicine Leaves including Gloria Petyarre, Rosemary Petyarre and Jeanie Petyarre all of whom are related.  They all paint with in a kaleidoscope of rich colour and differing leaf sizes and shapes.

Looking for a variety of aboriginal women artist paintings? Take your pick at The Mandel Aboriginal Art Gallery and see what more we have to offer! Call us at 03 94975111 for more information.

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Yondee Shane Hansen, Master of Black and White Aboriginal Artwork

Mandel Aboriginal Art Gallery is delighted to announce to the Australian indigenous art community that we have acquired some brilliant new aboriginal artworks directly from artist Yondee Shane Hansen which will be displayed in our aboriginal art gallery in Melbourne. We are excited to share this platform with Yondee, with his series of aboriginal art Fire and Rain dreamings. Having spent much time on the phone with him, it is clear he is a proud indigenous man whose connection to his land, his people and his dreamtime stories will resonate strongly with those who are taken aback by his works. We believe Yondee will certainly capture the attention of art collectors and those looking to incorporate indigenous art into their home or business.

Yondee is a Noongar man and an indigenous artist born in 1964 in the south-west of Western Australia at Dumbleyung located 270km south of Perth.

As a highly skilled and talented aboriginal artist, Yondee has developed an individual style of working with sand and ochres to illustrate the aboriginal sand art stories and legends of his people.

Yondee Shane Hansen Fire and Rain Dreaming

 

Mandel Aboriginal Art Gallery, Australian indigenous art, aboriginal arts, Fire and Rain dreamings, Yondee Shane Hansen
Mandel Aboriginal Art Gallery, Australian indigenous art, aboriginal arts, Fire and Rain dreamings, Yondee Shane Hansen

 

Yondee uses sand and ochres to illustrate the stories and legends of his people which generally refer to the country and the effects of the elements on the land. “I make sand paintings, collecting sand from the creeks. You have to wash it to get the salt out, but the sand is different out of the creeks, its smoother. When you have washed it a few times and sieved it, then mixed with paint, it’s good to use. When I make sand paintings using black and white, it’s that simple strong message.”

His early years were spent around the Narrogin with his father and later moved to the Swan River close to Guildford located on the outskirts of Perth. His initial upbringing and how his attraction to paintings exposes how his own life testimony reinforces his role as an Aboriginal artist.

Yondee learnt to paint from several mediums – His own father first taught him to hunt and also introduced him to sand drawings. Secondly, as a ten year old he would often visit his aunties whom lived on the Swan River and assist them in collecting paper bark and help them with their art work. The knowledge that Yondee gained from both his father and later his aunties who are renowned for their paintings on paper bark has been invaluable in shaping his career.

 

His works can be interpreted as abstract in their presentation however his vision of his dreaming is powerful enough to see. As a young boy, Yondee learnt his grandfather’s ground paintings and wishes to continue these and feels the translation of them to sand paintings does them justice and brings them to new audiences.

 

Looking for a variety of  contemporary indigenous artists profile or  Australian contemporary art for sale? Take your pick at The Mandel Aboriginal Art Gallery and see what more we have to offer! Call us at 0394975111 for more information.

Top 10 famous Aboriginal women artists Australia

Top 10 famous Aboriginal women artists Australia from Mandel Aboriginal Art Gallery Melbourne

Christine Yukenbarri

Christine Yukenbarri is the daughter of two of Balgo’s most famous Australian artists, and Lucy Yukenbarri. Born in 1977 at Balgo, Western Australia (previously Balgo Hills and Balgo Mission). Christine belongs to the Kukatja language group and to the Nakamarra skin Group. Currently she lives with her father and sisters, in a small community at Balgo, Western Australia.

Christine began painting in 2000, regarded as one of Warlayirti artist (Indigenous art and culture center hub) and have become most promising and merging artists. She was taught to paint by her father and mother however given her style in the kinti – kinti (close-close) manner of aboriginal art technique dotting  she has been mainly influences by her mother as this was a method first introduced by her mother.

Her unusual and unique executive aboriginal art on canvas and with aboriginal art on glass is recognized as being both innovative and distinctive. Christine’s dreaming and stories revolve around a number of subjects relating to the landscape her late my mother country in the Great Sandy Desert and these include Witjinki (Soak Water), Mungari (Bush Food) and Winpurpurla (Water). Christine is swiftly being identified as one of this country’s outstanding young artists. Each piece of her work portrays a refinement of a more seasoned artist however her energy in her approach to colour is stunning and ultimately defines her unique and individual flair.

Anna Petyarre

Anna Petyarre was born within the region of Utopia in 1960 and belongs to the language group of the eatern Ammatyerre. Currently she divides her time living both at her birth plave Boundary Bore (Atneltyeye) and in Alice Springs. Anna is a highly respected Utopia artist within splendid skills and original talents that highlights and instantly defines her painitings and themes.

Anna was introduced to painting whilst still a child with the guidance of her artistic mother the late “Glory Ngale” however she was also surrounded by other famous artists whom she is related to (the late “Emily Kame Kngwarreye” and Kudditji Kngwarreye”) through her grandfather who was bother to Emily and Kudditji father.

Highly regard for her artistic awareness to detail within her paintings, often consisting of intricate and blended designs that are so meticulous in structure that purposely focus on expressing her ancestral heritage which is major factor in describing Anna’a pallet as original.

It is quite evident from Anna’s key topics which over a of time have seen to have evolved, in earlier times her paintings focused on Bush Yam Seed Dreaming  and because of her involvement in traditional Aboriginal Women Ceremonies she also painted “Awelye” (Body Painting) affiliated with Women Ceremony.

Current works tend to illustrate her ancestral country, denoted by fine rows of dots indicating locations of various landmarks such as sand hills and river flood plains along with waterholes and ceremonial sites

Dorothy Napangardi

Dorothy Napangardi was born in C1956 at Mina Mina near Lake McKay in the Tanami Desert. Mina Mina is located north of Yuendumu approximately 400Km North West of Alice Springs in Central Australia. Dorothy is considered as a dominant artist of the contemporary Aboriginal Art faction with her paintings showcasing in exhibitions both in Australia and abroad.

Dorothy began her painting career in 1987 through an introduction by her sister Eunice Napangardi whom is also a highly respected artist.  The stories/dreaming that are the main focus to Dorothy’s painting revolve around the landscape of her father’s homeland at Lake McKay, depicting this region in her own individual and distinctive technique. Her painting are fashioned by the weaving of grid like of dotted lines, forming a mirco and marco interpretation of the landscape.

Her works are a representation of the topography of her homeland whilst giving an account of the ancestral tracks. The grid like lines relate to the salt incrustations around the dry clay pans etched with the tracks of the women.

Dorothy has five daughters all of whom have been taught to paint the stories and dreaming which have influenced her own artistic career.

Since being introduced to painting in 1987, Dorothy’s work has been further recognised in that she has received  a number of  major awards including the 2001 18th Telstra NATSIA Art Award and in 2009 was listed as one of the 50 most collectible artists by the Australian Art Collector magazine. Unfortunately as a result of an accident sadly Dorothy passed away in 2013.

Eubena Nampitjin

Eubena Nampitjin exact date of birth is unknown, however it is estimated to be during the 1920s at Tjinjadpa, located west of Jupiter Wells on the Canning Stock Route in Western Australia.  She was regarded as a highly respected law women, who provided enormous input and consultation on all topics of law. Whilst the are many talented and exceptional artists from Balgo , Eubena’s reputation as an artist stands above them all.

As a young girl Eubena and her family travelled extensively on the northern fringes of the Great Sandy Desert leading a life of hunters and gatherers along with performing ceremonies and law for the preservation of the country and for their own protection.

Eubena often spoke of the severe conditions of life in the bush and the effect this nomadic existence which contributed to the loss of family either by moving to other areas or through death. With her husband and family they eventually found themselves travelling up the Canning Stock Route to the community of Ballina and from there continued to stay within the mission as it moved about until finally settling at its present location Balgo Hills. In spite of living at Balgo Hills where she initially tendered to herds of goats she would still regularly enjoy a trek back to her country and live the nomadic lifestyle for extended periods.

Eubena and her second husband (Wimmitji) began to paint in the mid 1980’s. Their paintings highlighted a brilliant and elaborate compilation supported by a fondness towards the warm reds, oranges and yellows which has become a trademark of Eubena’s works. Both of their reputations as prominent artists flourished at Balgo, along with Eubena establishing her own status as a solo painter where is now identified as mentioned earlier as Balgo’s leading artist in addition to being  classed one of Australia’s premier indigenous painters.

Gabriella Possum Nungurrayi

Gabriella Possum was born in 1967 at Mt. Allen, Northern Territory. She is the eldest daughter of one of Australia’s most renowned aboriginal artists, Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri, who died in 2002. Gabriella began painting at an early age with the guidance of her father, who taught her how to paint and together they have collaborated on many important works. Her younger sister Michelle is also a noteworthy artist in her own right having benefited from the guidance of her late father.

Gabriella’s paintings predominantly depict a series of Dreaming stories passed down to her from her paternal grandmother, Long Rose Nangala and other senior women. Whilst Gabriella paints numerous dreaming her two more prominent relate to Grandmother’s Country – located at Mount Allan in the Northern Territory.
This is a place of significance where bush food is in abundance and the paintings depict the women gathering all types of food such as berries, yams and honey ants along with other important landmarks such as water holes.

The second prominent dreaming is titled The Seven Sisters (Milky Way) – other stories include Worm Dreaming, My Father’s Country and Serpent Dreaming from her Anmatyerre heritage.At age 16, Gabriella was the youngest artist to be awarded the Alice Springs Art Prize whilst completing her studies at the Yirara College. Her innate talent and knowledge of women’s dreaming was further enhanced through her association with the Papunya Tula painters, namely her father’s brother Tim Leura Tjapaltjarri and many others.

Gabriella has exhibited extensively throughout Australia and internationally with her art being represented in major private and public gallery collections. Currently Gabriella lives in Melbourne along with her husband and five children.

Gloria Petyarre

Gloria Petyarre was born C1945 at Mosquito Bore, Utopia in the Northern Territory. She is part of the Anmatyerre community located just north of Alice Springs. Her overall status as a highly recognised and significant artist within the contemporary Australian Aboriginal Art field is well documented both in Australian and overseas, in fact in 2014 her overall career ranking on the Australian Indigenous Art Market was 13th.

A founding member of the Utopia Women’s Batik Group in the 1970s’ Gloria is regarded as an innovative and dynamic artist; she exerted a great influence on others in the group. Gloria painted the traditional women business subjects, which are predominant in Utopia. Her art has developed to the point that the majority of her works now have no dots at all. Her technique is renowned for its abstract fields and vibrant colours.

In the past Gloria’s main dreaming represents Mountain Devil Lizard, Bean, Emu, Pencil Yam Grass as well as traditional body paint designs worn by women during ceremonies. For some time now the major focus has been towards painting the “Bush Medicine Leaves”.

These paintings depict particular leaves from plant species, which contain medicinal properties. The Aboriginal women from Utopia in Central Australia gather the leaves. The leaves are boiled; resin is added and mixed into a paste, which is used as bush medicine for many ailments.

Using the close tonal values of different colours, creating a dynamic optical intensity continues to develop her paintings to elevated levels of abstraction, continually experimenting with both with line and colour resulting in the optical effects being quite stunning.

Jeannie Petyarre

Jeannie Petyarre was born in C 1957 at boundary Bore a tiny community within the Utopia district, and belongs to the Anmatyerre language and therefore commonly referred to as an Anmatyerre woman.

It comes as no surprise that Jeannie is regarded as a highly skilled and talented given the quality of talent that runs within her family. She is the niece of the late and famous “Emily Kame Kngwarreye, her sister Rosemary also a highly respected artist in her own right and half sibling Evelyn Pultura (2005 NATSIA award winner). Jeannie does not only rely on the support of her accomplished and artistic family enhance her creative artistic skills, she also draws inspiration from a stunning landscape of her homeland to gain creativity.

A very talented artist who paints several dreaming with Bush Medicine Leaves & Bush Yam being two of the more prominent. Her work is characterized by vibrant fresh colours and designs celebrating the spirit of the yam plant (Kurrajong Tree) as it generates year after year to feed the people. ‘Bush Medicine’ relates to the process of mixing various fruits and plants with animal fat to create medicine. Jeannie paintings are widely sort in both Australia and overseas.

Margaret Lewis Napangardi

Margaret Lewis Napangardi is a Warlpiri woman who comes from a family of talented and recognised painters. Born in C1956 at Mount Doreen Station in Central Australia. She is a full blooded sister to the highly acclaimed and respected artist the late “Dorothy Napangardi” and skin sister to the equally profiled artist the late “Judy Watson Napangardi” with whom she lived with at Yuendumu until Judy passed away in 2017.

Whilst Margaret developed her own individual style she has taken on board some acquired aspects of both Judy’s and Dorothy’s pallet which both produced art in contrasting styles. Dorothy’s expressed her works in mainly black and white whereas Judy would utilize a large variety of colours.

Margaret’s current paintings have been restrained in colour, although they still contain some high contrasts of red, yellow and black. Across these styles Margaret draws on elements as mentioned earlier of the refined dot work of her sister and the thick bands of single colours used by Judy Napangardi Watson.

These paintings reflect typical Warlpiri style with the use of strong vibrant colours and microscopic dotting. The main themes of her painting reflect stories relating to her country (Mina Mina) and stories which depict Women‘s Stories and their sacred sites around her homeland of “Mina Mina”. Margaret has featured in exhibitions both in Australia and abroad. Currently Margaret is spending time in Adelaide.

Minnie Pwerle

Minnie Pwerle was born in C. 1922 in the region of Utopia. Like her famous sister in law “Emily Kngwarreye” Minnie Pwerle aboriginal artist began her brief but fruitful painting career in 1999 and only painted for approximately seven years.

Her rhythmic and linear artworks representing her country of Atnwengerrp immediately captured the attention many collectors both nationally and internationally. In this time it is exterminated that she produced in excess of 4000 paintings.

Minnie depicts “Awelye Atnwengerrp” by painting a series of lines in alternative widths, patterns and colours. These motifs represent aboriginal body paintings which includes the designs painted on the upper torso of women during ceremonies.

Motifs can vary from aboriginal ceremony to ceremony. In many cases Australian famous bush paintings motifs have as bush fruit, bush melons form part of the body paint, this is quite prevalent in many of Minnie’s works. These designs are usually defined by meandering linear circles and breast motifs defined by different colours, creating very fluid and bold paintings. Minnie had seven children, including Barbara Weir, who is a well-known Aboriginal artist. Minnie lived in Utopia, she continued to paint up until her death in March 2006.

Polly Ngala

Polly Ngala was born at Camel Camp Utopia, approximately 300Km east of Alice Springs in the Northern Territory in C1936. Currently Polly divides her time living both at Camel Camp with her family and sisters, (Kathleen Ngala,, Maisy Ngala and Angeline Pwerle Ngala) and also in Alice Springs. Her language group is Anmatyarr and skin name Ngala.

Like many of the Utopian women Polly’s artistic career also began in batik prior to making the transition to acrylic paints on canvas. Initially in the earlier part of her career she was known to assist her sister Kathleen and the late and famous Emily Kame Kngwarreye with whom she shared the same country. Her country from her father’s side is Alparra with her mother coming from Ngwelay or more commonly referred to as Kurrajong Bore. Polly along with her sisters are recognised as senior guardians of the Bush Plum (Arnwekety) Dreaming.

Polly’s painting portray the Bush Plum and how it impacts on her country. The topography is usually illustrated through shades of red, oranges and yellows which highlight the changing of the seasons. This is achieved by the construction of overlapping layers of colour generating a multi-dimensional outcome to reveal the Bush Plum (Ankwekety) and her region Alparra at its finest. Polly is deemed as one of the finest contemporary painters from Utopia with her work having been exhibited both in Australia and abroad.

Looking for a variety of aboriginal women artist paintings? Take your pick at The Mandel Aboriginal Art Gallery and see what more we have to offer! Call us at 03 94975111 for more information.

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History of Australian Indigenous Art

History of Australian Indigenous Art by Mandel Aboriginal Art Gallery

Australian indigenous art from an artistic point of view is regarded as the longest established semblance of art in the world. Some of the earliest format of Aboriginal art recognized were ground designs, rock carvings and body paintings. Some of these engravings are known to date back in excess of 60,000 years which were originally found on some of the cave walls in Arnhem Land.

This ancient form of art illustrates the motifs of the indigenous people of this period such as birds, animals, mythological creatures and other designs closely associated with their daily lives.

Historically, Indigenous Australians have been subject to constant changes and adaptability and this momentum can also be applied to Aboriginal art and culture. In the present aboriginal art spans across a vast array of avenues and displays the richness and contrast of the Indigenous heritage also highlighting the differences between language groups and territorial landscapes.

There are different channels that indigenous artists gain their creativity in the production of their works ranging from what we term as “traditional” origins –such as and body painting (Body painting is still in use today especially for ceremonies) and from many current fields of modern society.

Amongst these differences, various styles have emerged which depict the artists dreaming stories and others which interpret more current accounts ranging from “first contact”, the effect of colonization and subjects that have and are impacting currently on their daily lives.

In summary, Aboriginal art is extremely fascinating, revealing and much more than just dots.

Looking for a variety of aboriginal women artist paintings? Take your pick at The Mandel Aboriginal Art Gallery and see what more we have to offer! Call us at 03 94975111 for more information.

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What is the significance of Aboriginal Art and Symbols

The significance of aboriginal art and symbols for the indigenous people is that for centuries they have utilized inventive drawings and markings to recount their stories and messages which is a vital ingredient within their culture.

Whilst indigenous art can be presented in various formations such as dots, cross hatching, maps of circles, spirals, lines and dashes which are recognized as being the traditional aboriginal art communication of the Western Desert people. However it is the dot paintings which have become internationally acknowledged as distinctive and fundamental within Australian Indigenous Artwork with symbolic significance.

The recognition of dot painting can be traced back to round about 1971 when a teacher from New South Wales (Geoffrey Barden) was appointed as an art teacher to the Aboriginal children at Papunya (nearby Alice Springs). He observed that whist the men would tell their aboriginal stories to children’s, they would draw symbols in the sand as to how they interrupted these stories. Bardon then encouraged the children to transfer these stories to canvas and board, which started aboriginal art by children. Within a short period a large number of the men followed suit and began painting as well.

Australian aboriginal dot paintings generally portray an account normally related to hunting or food gathering, usually immersed with customary aboriginal symbols ingrained throughout the painting. Upon explanation of these embedded symbols a whole new meaning within the painting is immediately evident.

1. People Sitting

This circular symbol is a representation of either a campsite or water hole. The “U” shaped figures are people sitting around the waterhole or campsite.

2. Animal Tracks

The aboriginal people usually have individual signs which denote what type of animal that each represents – in this case it depicts Australia’s wild native dog “The Dingo”.

3. Sandhill or Cloud

This particular symbol to the aboriginal people has a multi meaning, as the heading states it can highlight a sand hill, cloud or some kind of wind break or shelter.

4. Rain

This icon has great significance to the indigenous artwork for the people of Central Australia. Rain can sometimes be a rare commodity to these people and when it does arrive it is celebrated with song and dance during ceremonies.

5. Honey Ant

Indigenous women with their digging, dig deep into the sand in the hunt for honey ants. The honey ants produce a honey- like liquid in their abdomen, which is regarded as a special treat by Aboriginal people in Central Australia.

6. Spears

This image illustrates two samples of a spear. The spears are hand made by the Aboriginal men and used as weapons for hunting prey. The men heat the spears over fire or in hot ash to straighten or strengthen the wood.

7. Woomera.

The icon known as a “Woomera” however it is also known as a spear thrower launcher.

8. Shield

This implement also can be utilized in a number of ways however on of its main function is for protection especially during inter-tribal rivalry.

9. Emu.

This image illustrates the emu track. The Aboriginal men peruse these tracks in their hunt for emu (large flight-less bird), which is a prime food source (bush tucker) and is used for bush medicine. Within men’s ceremonies, the emu feathers are used as body decoration. There are numerous symbols illustrating the emu track, these vary  based on the artist’s region.

10. Bush Tucker / Bush Berry

Bush berries are a primary food source which is gathered by the women of central Australia. Notice that we have referred to this staple food source as these berries come in many species.

11. Waterholes & Running Water

This icon depicts two waterholes (concentric circles) connected by flowing water (wavy lines).

12. Boomerangs

The boomerang serves as multi-purpose tool by the Australian Aboriginal men. They can be used as a hunting implement or weapons for fighting.  They are also utilized for digging, as cutting knives for lighting fires through friction and also be used as a percussion instrument during ceremonies.

13. Kangaroo Tracks

This image refers to the track of the kangaroo. Aboriginal men hunt the kangaroo by following its tracks in the sand.

14. Tracks/Waterholes

This icon depicts campsite or resting place (circle) and the journey path joined by straight lines connecting with the circles, a common feature seen in a large number of Australian Aboriginal artworks.

15. Meeting Place

This icon represents meeting place (concentric circles) and journey path (lines). The meeting place is culturally a significant site to Aboriginal men and women. It is a place where Aboriginal people gather together, sitting in circles; this is seen as a normal practice among the indigenous people.

16. Campsites / Waterhole

Concentric circle can portray a campsite, meeting place or ceremonial site or perhaps a waterhole These sites are not only culturally important to Aboriginal people living in Central Australia but important from a survival point  given that this symbol may be a waterhole rather than a campsite.

17. Hunting Boomerang

Apart from being used a clapping sticks in ceremonies the hunting boomerang is normally hunt for the larger type of animal either kangaroo or emu. The boomerang is usually a hand crafted implement by the Aboriginal men –it takes the shape of the figure seven the longer part of the instrument is the handle with the shorter wing which is extremely sharp being the damaging part.

18. Coolamon

A Coolamon is a hand-crafted wooden dish, which is used by the Aboriginal women when gathering bush tucker, transporting water or carrying babies.

19. Digging Sticks / Clapping Sticks

Digging sticks are hand crafted wooden tools, sharpened at one end, which the Aboriginal women use to dig for edible bush tucker (roots, tubers, honey ants, reptiles).  In women ceremonies they are used as clapping stick.

20. Woman

This symbol depicts a woman and a digging stick. Aboriginal women use a digging stick to collect out edible bush food (roots, yam, and witchetty grub). In ceremony the women use digging sticks as clapping sticks.

21.  Men

This image represents a man with spears. The spear is a hand-crafted weapon the Aboriginal men use for hunting larger prey. The icon(s) depicted next to the U shape, determines if it is a male or female.

22.  Person

The U shape icon represents a person. The U shape icon can represent male or female.

23. Witchetty Grub

This image shows the witchetty grub which are mainly collected by women living in Central Australia. The witchetty grubs, a principal food source (bush tucker) for the Aboriginal people living in Central Australia.

24. Goanna

This icon represents the tracks of the goanna. Aboriginal people hunt the goanna by following its tracks in the sand. The Goanna and its eggs are again a principal food source (bush tucker). There are various symbols depicting the goanna track, depending on the artist’s region.

Few of Indigenous Australian symbols and aboriginal art symbols.

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Top Selling Aboriginal Artists 2015 from Mandel Aboriginal Art Gallery

Top Selling Aboriginal Artists 2015 from Mandel Aboriginal Art Gallery

Walangkura Napanangka

Women Ceremony is Walangkura‘s dreaming through her painting depicts stories of the country and specific sites of her traditional homeland closely associated with sacred women sites where ceremonies are held within Kintore area. Her pallet of deep sandy orange highlighted against more sombre white and yellow, tightly packed with an intensity of geometric line work represents the sand hills of the sacred sites.

Minnie Pwerle

Awelye is Minnie’s painting depicts body painting, designs which women would paint on their upper bodies for ceremonies. The structure consists of a series of lines in alternative widths, patterns and colours along with in this case with circles representing bush melons to form part of body painting.

Gloria Petyarre

Bush Medicine Leaves is the painting portrays leaves from plant species containing medicinal properties. The leaves are boiled, resin is added and mixed into a paste, which is used as bush medicine for many ailments. Gloria’s blending of different colours that appear to create an intensity of elevated levels of abstraction, which result in the optical effects being quite stunning to the viewer.

Jeannie Petyarre

Jeannie is known to paints her dreaming style which is “Bush Medicine Leaves”. Jeannie paints bush tucker stories, such as this stunning piece her work is characterized by vibrant and intricate designs that immediately captures one’s attention. “Bush Medicine” relates to the process of mixing various fruits and plants with animal fat to create medicine.

Ningura Naparulla

Ancestral Travels – this painting recounts the travels of Ningura’s ancestors and the rockhole site of Walyuta south-west of Kintore in the Western Desert in Central Australia. Ningura’s work is characterized with the strong dynamism and bold linear design compositions created by heavy layers of acrylic paint.

George Ward Tjungurrayi

Tingari Cycle (refers to the travels of his ancestors in mythological times). George’s painting relates to such an event which is generally of a secret nature and as such limited details are available. Tingari are regarded as a group of ancestral beings of dreaming who traveled over vast areas of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping specific sites on the landscape.

Gabriella Possum Nungurrayi

Seven Sisters Dreaming – This magnificent painting by Gabriella depicts the story of seven sisters walking through the Tanami desert being perused by male (known as the Jakamarra man). To  get away from him, the seven sisters have the capacity to materialize into stars and head for the night sky above the desert however in be known to them the Jakamarra man also has the power to materialize into a star as he does and follows them but is always one step behind. The seven circles represent the sisters and a gap to the eighth represents the Jakamarra man



Top 10 reasons for considering aboriginal paintings as an idea for Christmas gifts and presents – 2018

Top 10 reasons why to own an fabulous aboriginal painting this Christmas for yourself or Christmas present for a loved one. Indigenous art is unique and for someone who has everything it may be the perfect gift.

1. Unique, Original & Authentic 

All paintings are Unique, Original & Authentic with no two pieces are alike.

2. Traditional or contemporary styles

Our varied catalog allows you a choice of either a traditional or a more contemporary style of painting unique to Indigenous artwork.

3.  Various Shape, size, and colour range

Whatever your choice of painting, there are in excess of 900 pieces to choose from which come in various shapes, size and colour range to suit any style of home or office.

4. Quality and Class

You’ll be purchasing a painting that will be a showpiece of quality and class.

5. Reputation and excellent service 

All purchases are supported by the relevant documentation from a long established and reputable gallery with qualified personnel with the knowledge to advise and answer your queries thus giving you peace of mind to purchase with confidence.

6.  Purchasing an asset

Think of your purchase as an asset which in time should appreciate in value and can be passed on at a later stage.

7.  Choice of stretching or framing

Choice of stretching or framing with or without shadow frame and the availability to hang you either portrait or landscape all inclusive.

8.  Certificate of Authenticity (CoA)

CoA is provided for all paintings from our gallery verifying an original work from the nominated artist.

9.  Best value for money

Why pay more for lasting quality, our pricing is structured to accommodate all buyers.

10.  Purchasing an experience

Visit our Gallery which is bursting with the greatest range of paintings at the best prices.  You’ll take home more than just a painting, you’ll be taking home an experience.

View range of artist dreaming’s and their styles

Judy Watson , Betty Mbitjana , Dorothy Napangardi , Gabriella Possum Nungurrayi 

Different Traditional, Contemporary styles, and combination of both

Looking for a variety of contemporary indigenous artists profile or Australian contemporary art for sale? Take your pick at The Mandel Aboriginal Art Gallery and see what more we have to offer! Call us at 0394975111 for more information.

Top 10 famous Indigenous artist Australia

1. Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri

Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri is regarded as the most celebrated Australian indigenous artist and certainly from the Central Western desert area especially the country north of western McDonnell Ranges. Born in 1932 on Napperby Station, he initially worked as a stock-man on various cattle stations in and around this location to which he cited to as his country. He is known as a first generation artist beginning his artistic career in 1971 and considered as both master and pioneer of the central western dot painting. Clifford foresight to combine the customary traditional along with the contemporary was amazing and as a result he produced art which appeared to progress beyond the canvas in a manner which followed the viewer as they admire the artwork.

2. Emily Kame Kngwarreye

Aboriginal artist Emily Kame Kngwarreye requires no introduction, she was born at Soakage Bore (Alhalkere) North West boundary of Utopia . Her career as painter lasted only eight years, brief in anybody’s language however in this short time she managed to produce a massive 4000 – 5000 works. Emily Kame Kngwarreye aboriginal art can be described as impulsive and natural. Known for her headstrong and independent personality which was a product of her younger days working with camels giving her abundant strength in both her arms and hands and as a result this constantly is reflected through her type paintings style such as Awelye and yam dreaming (pencil yam and yam seed), drawing long winding with camels giving her paintings, drawing long winding lines and bashing out of dots with her uncommonly powerful hands and arms, exhibiting her capacity to use the most incredible overlays of colours to generate deeply brilliant paintings. As the world become aware of her status as an artist she was constantly pressured from within her community, family and beyond notably with dealers and collectors both nationally and from abroad. Emily was also well known for walking away from her finished paintings without even inspecting the finished products.

3. Minnie Pwerle

Minnie was born in C. 1922 in the region of Utopia. Like her famous sister in law “Emily Kngwarreye” Minnie Pwerle aboriginal artist began her brief but fruitful painting career in 1999 and only painted for approximately seven years. Her rhythmic and linear artworks representing her country of Atnwengerrp immediately captured the attention many collectors both nationally and internationally. In this time it is exterminated that she produced in excess of 4000 paintings. Minnie depicts ”Awelye Atnwengerrp” by painting a series of lines in alternative widths, patterns and colours. These motifs represent aboriginal body paintings which includes the designs painted on the upper torso of women during ceremonies. Motifs can vary from aboriginal ceremony to ceremony. In many cases Australian famous bush paintings motifs have as bush fruit, bush melons form part of the body paint, this is quite prevalent in many of Minnie’s works. These designs are usually defined by meandering linear circles and breast motifs defined by different colours, creating very fluid and bold paintings.

4. Gloria Tamerre Petyarre

Gloria was born in C 1942 /45 at The Boundary Bore Utopia in the Northern Territory. This area is well renowned for producing a large number of Australia’s elite/ famous indigenous artist and within this group is Gloria’ acclaimed aunt the late “Emily Kame Kngwarreye”. Working alongside Emily along with inspiration from other notable women whom produced ground breaking success through their own individual vision created art of great expressive abstraction artwork. Learning from these wonderful tutors Gloria was able to tap this experience and produce her own exclusive aboriginal style. Early in her career she painted the traditional women business subjects, which are predominant in Utopia however her art has now developed to such an extent that the majority of her works are dot free. Gloria’s painting can be described as energetic and vibrant which highlight the energy of the landscape and communicate an underlying strong spirituality with a career which has been in progress for over 30 years Gloria has become one of Australia’s most successful female artists.

5. Ronnie Tjampitjinpa

More than any other figure, Ronnie Tjampitjinpa can be credited with having confirmed a new artistic course in embracing delicate minimalism, thereby freeing up the further likelihood for the younger up-coming generation of painters, and thereby challenging the fixed appreciation of Western Desert Art.
Ronnie was born C1943 at Tjiturrunya, West of Kintore Ranges in Western Australia. In the early 1950s’ Ronnie & his family moved to Haasts Bluff and then on to Papunya. Ronnie’s works first appeared in 1975 when he began to paint for the Papunya painting movement. In the early 1980s’ he moved to Walungurru where he has emerged as one of Papunya Tula’s major artists. Ronnie‘s art is a good representation of the characteristic Pintupi style: repetition of forms, simple & bold, and pigments which are often restricted to four basic colours of black, red, yellow & white. However it is widely recognized he does experiment with other colours Since his earliest participation with the central desert art organisation Ronnie has been committed and has emerged as one of the territory’s master painters.

6. Dorothy Napangardi

In 2001 Dorothy Napangardi was the recipient of the 18th National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award. Dorothy’s endeavours as an artist at the beginning of her career in the 1980’s saw her focus being greatly determined by memories of her childhood. The painting usually portrayed mainly Bush Tucker – Bush Plum, Bush Banana and other wild fruits which grew in abundance surrounding the location of her birth place “Mina Mina”. Dorothy was born around C early 1950’s at Mina Mina area within the Tanami desert and sadly as a result of a tragic accident passed away in June 2013. From 1997 onward, Dorothy’s artistic pallet developed her own unique and individualist style which depicted the grid-like patterns of the salt membrane on the Mina Mina clay pans marking a remarkable artistic change in her work. Over a three-year period her paintings became less and less elaborate and increasingly sparse, all detail pruned back to the barest essentials. The rows of white dots in the paintings depict the movement of the Mina Mina ancestral women as they journeyed across Lake Mackay, a significant site near Yuendumu in Central Australia. Throughout their travels the Warlpiri women used digging sticks during their ceremonies, as well as for gathering bush tucker. Dorothy regarded as one of Australia’s most collectable artist with her works featuring major galleries both here and abroad.

7. Tommy Watson

Tommy Watson is currently in his seventies and also is recognised as a Pitjantjatjara elder. His initials works were produced at an art centre at Irrunytju located approximately 12kms south west of the tristate boarder of South Australia, Western Australia and Northern Territory just 40kms from his birth place at Anamarapiti C. 1935. Tommy visited Papunya in his youth witnessing the birth of the Western Desert art at the time; however it was a long way down the track before Tommy felt the urge to tell his stories via his paintings, in fact Tommy began his artistic career in 2002 and his woks were acknowledged with immediate recognition. For a long period of time now the demand for Tommy’s works is constantly exceeding the ability to satisfy the market. His paintings mainly express the history of the land incorporating such features as rock holes, mountain ranges and creek beds. Many of his works reflect or are reminiscent of nuclear shock waves, light waves and explosions which are a reminder of the effects from the British nuclear testing in this locality during the 1950’s. His paintings are often meet a twofold purpose – tending towards “Abstract Expressionism” while observing customary execution through camouflaging and “dotting” and often referred to as shining and radiant. Tommy’s ethics are at the forefront in his defiance to painting works upon demand. This unique philosophy is reflected in paintings that, at their best, are truly great works of art.

8. George Ward Tjungurrayi

George was born near Lararra, east of Tjukurla Western Australia C. 1945. His first contact with Europeans came via the welfare patrol which was led by Jeremy Long and Nosepeg Tjupurrula at a rock hole south Kiwirrkura. Whilst born to different mothers George Ward shared the same father with Yala Yala Gibbs and Willy Tjunurrayai. He travelled to Papunya in the early 1960’s still in his teenage years and gained employment as a fencer and later a butcher in the community kitchen. Commencing his artistic career in about 1976, he originally assisted senior artists who worked within the tightly knit group of established Pintupi painters. For the novices like George, it was an apprenticeship in the skills, knowledge and cultural obligations required for the artistic function and for eventual ceremonial leadership within his tribal territory. He quickly developed his own technique based on men’s designs used to decorate ceremonial artefacts incorporating dance regalia with their captivating interlocking geometric and parallel linear patterning. George’s paintings relate to “Tingari Cycle” and events associated with “Tingari” which are generally of a secret nature and as such limited details are available. Tingari are regarded as a group of ancestral beings of dreaming who travelled over vast areas of the country, performing rituals and creating and shaping specific sites. George has painted in various locations over a long and distinguished career including Yayayi and Waruwiya (outstations of MT Liebig) and back at Kintore where he worked alongside other prominent artists such as Joseph Jurra Tjapaltjarri and Ray James Tjangala. Today George is a highly regarded Indigenous painter still working, with his paintings being collected and exhibited both within and outside Australia.

9. Walangkura Napanangka

Born in 1946, at Tjitururrnga west of Kintore, in the remote and arid country between the Northern Territory and Western Australia border. Walangkura Napanangka lived with her parents and family, while still a teenager, she trekked by foot along with her family over the hundreds of kilometers from their isolated desert home eventually joining another group as they walked in to the settlements of Haasts Bluff and then Papunya. As one of the last generation to remember a childhood lived in the desert hunting and gathering with her family, Walangkura’s paintings heavily relate to the stories of country and the location of specific sites in her traditional homeland west of the salt lake of Karrkurutinjinya (Lake Macdonald). Early works, created from 1996 onward, are identified by an accumulation of small configurations and motifs covering substantial areas of canvas. Her favourite colour, a deep sandy orange holds sway, highlighted against more sombre blacks and reds and dusky greens or yellows. More recent works show an underlining quality, though still tightly packed with an intensity of geometric line work representing sand hills. Walangkura’s painting depict stories of the country and specific sites of her traditional homeland closely associated with sacred women sites where ceremonies are held in the Kintore area. Several members of Walangkura’s family were & are noted high profile painters. In her later years Walangkura encountered eye issues, this greatly impeded on her ability to paint and sadly she passed away in 2014. She is considered as one of the most collectable artists.

10. Ningura Napurrula

Ningura Napurrula was born at Watulka, south of Kiwirrkurra, Western Australia in C1938 – and passed away in 2013. She was married to Yala Yala Gibbs Tjungurrayi (now deceased), an outstanding artist whom was also a founding member of the Papunya Tula Artists. In the early stages of her career she assisted her husband in completing brilliant and meticulous paintings depicting the Tingari Dreaming. By 1995 this influence was apparent when she began painting in her own right. Her powerful structures are identified by strong continuous designs, which are slowly built up through complex patterning, and appear boldly defined upon a background of dense uninterrupted infilling – yet her palette referring to the activities and sacred rituals reflects a subtle, more integrated creativity in comparison to the abstract control of the early classic style produced by the Pintupi painting men.
Depicting the use of Aboriginal iconography the painting recounts the travels of her ancestors and the rock hole site of Walyuta (south-west of Kintore) in the Western Desert in Central Australia. Ningura’s work is characterised with the strong dynamism and bold linear design compositions created by heavy layers of acrylic paint. (This is due to desert cultural restrictions that some of the designs are considered of a sacred status and as such cannot be viewed  by men or uninitiated women and therefore are first laid down and then covered with thick layer of paint). One of her paintings was used as a motif on an Australian stamp in 2003 in addition in 2006 she was one of eight aboriginal artists selected by the Museum du quai Branly (Paris) to paint a portion of the ceiling and facade. Ningura’s works have been shown and collected extensively throughout within and outside of Australia proof of her prominence as outstanding indigenous artist.

Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri

Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri

 

Emily Kame Kngwarreye

Emily Kame Kngwarreye

 

Minnie Pwerle

Minnie Pwerle paintings for sale

 

Gloria Tamerre Petyarre

Gloria Tamerre Petyarre painitngs for sale

 

Ronnie Tjampitjinpa

Ronnie Tjampitjinpa paintings for sale

 

Dorothy Napangardi

Dorothy Napangardi paintings for sale

 

Tommy Watson

Tommy Watson paintings for sale

 

George Ward Tjungurrayi

George Ward Tjungurrayi paintings for sale

 

Walangkura Napanangka

Walangkura Napanangka paintings for sale

 

NINGURA NAPURRULA

Ningura Napurrula paintings for sale


Looking for a variety of  contemporary indigenous artists profile or  Australian contemporary art for sale? Take your pick at The Mandel Aboriginal Art Gallery and see what more we have to offer! Call us at 0394975111 for more information.






Gabriella Possum Nungurrayi

Gabriella Possum Nungurrayi is the eldest daughter of renowned artist Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri, who was awarded Order of Australia in 2002. In 1985 Gabriella won the prestigious Alice Springs Art Award while still a student at Yirara College.
In Australia, Gabriella is recognized as a culturally significant artist and her work has been exhibited in the U.S.A and throughout Europe including the Modern Art-Ancient Icon exhibition (1992) and Down Under (1993).

Some of these acclaimed works include, Grandmother’s Dreaming, Seven Sisters Dreaming (Milky Way), Goanna, Bush Tucker Dreaming, My Father’s Country and Serpent Dreaming, which we proudly carry here at The Mandel Aboriginal Art Gallery.

Gabriella is best known for her Milky Way Dreamings however she also paints Water Dreaming and My Grandmother’s Country – Bush Tucker. Her work is in many major collections including the National Gallery of Australia and most recently she was commissioned by Aranda Aboriginal Art to complete a twenty metre art installation depicting her custodial Grandmother’s Country for Jamie Durie’s display at the 2008 RHS Chelsea Flower Show which was awarded gold.

At the 2008 Chelsea Flower Show, a Gabriella Possum artwork was presented to HRH Queen Elizabeth, which now hangs along side her fathers work within the walls of Buckingham Palace. Gabriella also broke her world wide auction record in 2008 when Grandmothers Country was sold by Artcurial 07 Jul 2008 at the Hôtel Dassault in Paris, France for 24,784 € (Euros). Gabriella now lives in Melbourne with her family.

Looking for a variety of Gabriella Possum Nungurrayi paintings? Take your pick at The Mandel Aboriginal Art Gallery and see what more we have to offer! Call us at 03 94975111 for more information.

Online store on Gabriella Possum Nungurrayi

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George Hairbrush Tjungarrayi

George Hairbrush Tjungarrayi is a famous Australian indigenous artist, he was born around 1943 at North West of Kiwirrkurra, located in the Gibson Desert in Western Australia. His ‘sisters’ are Naata and Nganngi (Nancy) Nungurrayi both famous aboriginal artists. George Tjungarrayi and his family lived a traditional life until they came out of the western desert region by way of Mt Doreen Station and Yuendumu.

In 1962, George walked to Papunya as a guide for Jeremy Long’s Welfare Branch patrol. In 1971, school teacher Geoffrey Bardon encouraged some of the senior men to paint a blank school wall. George’s ‘uncle’, Charlie Tarawa Tjungurrayi was one of the men involved. The school murals sparked immense interest and is seen as the catalyst of the Papunya art movement and the beginning of the Aboriginal Art Movement. George served as an apprentice artist to the senior artists in the Papunya art community.
He was surrounded and encouraged by some of the great artists in the Aboriginal art movement, and in 1976 he began to paint in his own right after encouragement from Nosepeg Tjupurrula, one of the founding artists of the Papunya art movement and a leading identity.
Whilst his early works resemble that of some of the great Papunya masters, George soon developed his own distinctive style of dreaming time stories. George has perfected a minimalist and abstracted style of painting that is characterised by transverse parallel lines that pulse with subtle optical rhythm.
While there are aesthetic parallels with works created by contemporary Western artists of the Op-art movement, George’s works are based on his country and culture. George’s artworks symbolise ancestral journeys and ceremonial body paint.
In particular, George paints the Tingari dreaming stories of his ancestral country which covers the western Australian aboriginal sites and northern territory aboriginal art sites around Kiwirrkura, Lake Mackay, Kulkuta, Karku, Ngaluwinyamana and Kilpinya.
Professor Vivien Johnson has also suggested that his striking imagery is drawn from the distinctive Western Desert style of ‘fluted’ carving; fine parallel lines incised into the wood and coated with ochres which embellished men’s ceremonial artworks such as boomerangs and shields.

At Mandel Aboriginal Art Gallery we had an George Tjungarrayi exhibition on Tingari dreaming paintings
https://mandelartgallery.com.au/exhibitions/george-hairbrush-tjungurrayi-exhibition-01-jul-14-jul-2016/

Some more than hypnotic art work for sale from George Hairbrush Tjungarrayi, https://mandelartgallery.com.au/artist/george-hairbrush-tjungurrayi/

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Meaning of Sign and Symbols in Aboriginal Art

Bessie Pitjara

Like many of the women artists of the Utopia region, Bessie began her artistic career in batiks before turning her enormous talents to acrylic paint on canvas. She was taught her craft by her famous mother, Polly Ngala [Ngale], with whom she now shares the same dreaming – Bush Plum [Arnwekety]. Bessie also paints the bush flowers with a strong and vibrant palette of beautifully dappled colours. She still lives at Utopia with her mother and her equally renowned aunties, Kathleen Ngala and Angeline Pwerle Ngala.

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Famous Aboriginal Artist’s

Most Selling Artist’s

Meaning of Sign and Symbols in Aboriginal Art